The District Architecture Center (DAC), in the heart of DC’s bustling Penn Quarter District, is where architecture meets the city. If you enjoy architecture, DAC is the place for you.

DAC houses the Washington Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the Washington Architectural Foundation. We are located in downtown Washington on land once occupied by the Nacotchtank: an indigenous Algonquian people who lived in the area during the 17th century. According to sources referenced on Wikipedia, the Nacotchtank village was situated within the modern borders of the District of Columbia along the intersection of two major rivers— the Potomac and the Anacostia. The name Nacotchtank, which exists in several historical variants including Nacostine, Anacostine, Anaquashtank, Nacothtant, Nachatanke, is derived from the word "anaquashatanik", which means "a town of traders.” The Nacotchtank were a trading people as they were established on fertile land with the nearby rivers. AIA|DC and WAF acknowledge the contributions of those who came before and believe that preserving the District’s natural resources is a way to actively honor their legacy.

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DAC Hours

Currently closed.

DAC Contacts

Need space for an event?

DAC’s beautiful meeting rooms, classrooms, and conference facilities are available for rent to groups of various sizes seeking an up-to-date meeting space that is conveniently located in the heart of downtown DC, within easy walking distance of all Metro lines.

Rent the DAC

Drop in and enjoy exhibitions, free of charge.

Thank you to all of our generous donors!

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The District Architecture Center was designed by Hickok Cole Architects and built by SIGAL Construction Corporation.

  • Hickcok Cole Architects
  • Sigal

The District Architecture Center houses the Washington Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the Washington Architectural Foundation.  We are located in downtown Washington on land once occupied by the Nacotchtank: an indigenous Algonquian people who lived in the area during the 17th century. According to sources referenced on Wikipedia, the Nacotchtank village was situated within the modern borders of the District of Columbia along the intersection of two major rivers— the Potomac and the Anacostia. The name Nacotchtank, which exists in several historical variants including Nacostine, Anacostine, Anaquashtank, Nacothtant, Nachatanke, is derived from the word "anaquashatanik", which means "a town of traders.” The Nacotchtank were a trading people as they were established on fertile land with the nearby rivers.  AIA|DC and WAF acknowledge the contributions of those who came before and believe that preserving the District’s natural resources is a way to actively honor their legacy.