Calendar

Film Night: Master Builders: A Documentary Featuring African American Architects in the Nation's Capital

  • Date

    Friday, August 7 2020

  • Time

    8:00pm-9:15pm

  • Location

    Online

In person, architecture can move us, but it can also touch us through storytelling and the medium of film. Remember when you first saw the 1927 science-fiction film Metropolis? Or The Fountainhead with Howard Roark, the ambitious and uncompromising young architect? This summer, we’ll recommend an architecture film each Friday to jumpstart your weekend. You can watch the film on your own time by accessing it through Kanopy, YouTube, or another shared platform. Share your thoughts about the film using #aiadcSummerNights. Grab some popcorn, get comfy, and enjoy the film!


Master Builders: A Documentary Featuring African American Architects in the Nation's Capital

Note: This film will begin promptly at 8pm via Zoom on Friday, August 7. This will be the only opportunity to watch the film.

Washington, DC is a tourist attraction, a place of monuments and landmarks, and the seat of the federal government. There are accredited schools of architecture at Howard University, the Catholic University of America, and an architectural technology program at the University of the District of Columbia. DC is home to numerous buildings designed by pioneering African American Architects. Some of the architects featured in this documentary include: Julian Abele, Calvin T.S. Brent, Eliz Brooks, and Albert I. Cassell.

Running Time: 70 mins
Year: 2012
Producer: Wil Stroman, Equip Productions Editor: Michelle A. Jones
Narrator: C.R. Gibbs


Organized by: Washington Architectural Foundation

Film courtesy of: Alexander Street, A ProQuest Company ProQuest's Alexander Street products are curated, discipline-focused, primary-source collections, websites, and streaming media for learning and research. We’re passionate about creating landmark online resources that help scholars and students discover and learn. Our collections deliver previously unavailable content in ways that further research and learning.